Case Study: Sarah-Beth Amos

Case Study: Sarah-Beth Amos

Sarah-Beth is a BBSRC iCASE student in collaboration with the pharmaceutical company UCB. Sarah-Beth studied Biochemistry at King’s College London and it was there that she became very interested in the physics and mathematics underlying biology. Sarah-Beth cites Nate Silver’s book The Signal and the Noise as the book that changed her life; it led to an obsession with models, data, and whether or not we can ever really predict the future. She taught herself to program in her spare time and carried out undergraduate projects in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and computational biology. She was subsequently awarded an MRC scholarship to study for her MRes in Molecular Biophysics at King’s and carried out a project on molecular simulation of antimicrobial peptides. (https://www.nature.com/articles/srep37639)

An iCASE studentship with Prof. Mark Sansom enabled her to focus her DPhil on simulation, mathematical modelling, and developing new computational methods for simulation analysis. She began her project looking at simulations of peripheral membrane proteins and moved into developing Markov State model analysis of disorder in protein-membrane interactions. Her work considers regions of disorder that are often ignored because they are difficult to investigate, but are of great importance when it comes to understanding the complexities of biological signalling. She won the SCI Young Lipid Scientist Award and was invited to give a talk at the EuroFed Lipid Congress in Sweden. She also won the £1000 Peter Beaconsfield Prize from the Medical Sciences Division for academic excellence.

1.	A Markov state model of a disordered loop interacting with the cell membrane.

A Markov state model of a disordered loop interacting with the cell membrane.